Study Skills Series: SQ3R

by Robert Craig, University of Bristol Law School

[The introduction to the series can be found here]

One widely recommended way to try to distil complex texts into notes is called “the SQ3R method”. It means “Skim, Question, Read, Recall, Review”. Some of you may find it useful, but – again – don’t force yourself to do things that don’t work for you. In essence, the SQ3R method means you first Skim the whole chapter and make a note of the main section headings, so you have an overview. Then you ask yourself (“Question”) what you are trying to get from the material – try to identify a few main things you want to know after each subsection. Then you Read a small section of the chapter – say 3-4 pages – without taking notes. Then you look away and Recall the main points. Then you Review those points by writing down the main points in your own words and from memory. This is crucial. Don’t write out what the author of the textbook said. And try to use simple, clear sentences. Also consider using the dictation tool on Word – my note taking improved massively when I started using that.

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Study Skill Series: How do I prepare for class?

by Robert Craig, University of Bristol Law School

[The introduction to the series can be found here]

Preparing properly for synchronous sessions is essential for them to be useful for you and for others in the seminar – please make the effort to engage actively with your peers and academic tutor for both seminars and consolidation sessions. It is impossible to take any meaningful part in seminars without doing a significant amount of prereading and thinking before class. Going to seminars with insufficient preparation tends to be quite stressful for most people because it is quite hard to follow what is going on if you are not on top of the materials. (more…)

Study Skills Series: An Introduction

by Robert Craig, University of Bristol Law School

Picture by Jason Tong

 Welcome to the first in this series of short blogs on how to make the best use of your time as a law student. It aims to cover a number of topics and was originally written for my first year public lawyer students:

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